Stay up to date with the Commerce Validated Technology Partner Solutions Feed!

I got this feed URL passed on to me by a colleague and if you use an RSS or Atom feed reader then this is right up your alley. You can view the feed in your favorite reader or even subscribe to it with browsers like FireFox. You can also just view the partner page to see the list of partners and their solutions.

You will immediately see there are three new partners on board already this year:

partnerfeed

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Tip of the day: How effective is your tweet?

searchThere are a lot of tools out there that help you measure how effective a tweet is doing. Did you know Twitter added a nice analytic package for your tweets? Last year Twitter launched a new page where you can measure the effectiveness and engagement of your tweets. Here I present two options that can help you figure out how well your tweets are doing in your network.

The first option is the new Twitter activity page on the Twitter site itself. Just follow this link (https://analytics.twitter.com) to view your engagement levels. You can gauge three different categories: Tweets, Followers, and Twitter Cards. Here are some screen shots on what you can expect:

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Responsive design and WebSphere Commerce

In this video I show a free way to develop responsive design advertisements using a combination of Eclipse and inline editing with Chrome. I showed this technique last year in the post “Tip Of the Day: Modifying and saving CSS with Google Chrome” and now I combine it with managed files in WebSphere Commerce Management Center.

 

Blog stats for 2014 and what I learned

Each year I read around the net how different blogs did for the year and attempt to compare myself to those blogs or just simply learn how I can do things better. I also get asked many times by aspiring tech bloggers how much traffic to expect. I always say “not much at first” but focus on “green content” – ie. content that will forever get hits from SEO and search engines, or timeless content. As you will see below, a majority of my top posts came from previous years. My average bounce rate was 1.37 for 2014, meaning each visitor viewed almost 1.4 posts on each visit. This at least tells me the majority of people who get sent to my blog look at another post for some reason or another.

This year I focused on developer and business content and cut way back on personal information and relied more on platforms like Facebook for that stuff. I also focused on what I considered better content and less frequent posts unless I had something good to share or it was time sensitive. So here are my results for this blog:

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